Bone Broth For A Healthier You

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Turkey Bone Broth After 17 Hours of Simmering

Turkey Bone Broth After 17 Hours of Simmering. Turkey carcass, skin, cartilage, etc. Break the carcass to fit in crock pot or stock pot, rinse off any leftover stuffing that may be attached, fill to the top with filtered water and add 2 Tablespoons of organic cider vinegar. Simmer for up to 24 hours.

When most of us hear the words bone broth I think soup usually comes to mind. However, did you know there is a big difference between broth, stock, and bone broth?  Broth is generally made with meat and a small amount of bones and only simmered for a short time. Stock is generally made with bones and water and is simmered for 3-4 hours.

Bone broth is made with bones and cartilage and sometimes a little meat that was left on the bones after roasting. Then, a couple of Tablespoons of organic unfiltered apple cider vinegar is added, sometimes vegetables, it is simmered either on the stove or in a crock pot for a long period of time, usually up to 24 hours. Although I’ve heard of people leaving it for days.

The benefits of drinking and cooking with bone broth are well, amazing really.

The carcass leftovers of an 18 pound organic turkey

The carcass leftovers of an 18 pound organic turkey.

Bone broth has the ability to:

~ Increase your body’s ability to absorb minerals

~ Heal leaky gut syndrome (which many doctors agree is the leading cause of food allergies)

~ Support connective tissue

~ Grow stronger, healthier hair and nails

~ Keep your joints healthy

~ Heal adrenal fatigue

~ Detoxify the liver because it is high in glycine

~ Give us healthier bones, ligaments, tendons, and skin because it is packed with glycine and proline which is the biological glue that holds our bodies together

~ Calm an overactive immune system and help to rebuild stronger and healthier cells

~ Heal autoimmune conditions by healing the gut

~ Aid digestion by regulating bile and gastric acid

~ Balance blood sugar and help reverse heart disease by reducing plaque build up

~ Improve nervous system function

~ Help with inflammation

~ Aid in thyroid health and hormone balance

Turkey Bone Broth

Turkey Bone Broth

Who knew something so incredibly easy to make could be so beneficial for our health? Now, let’s get down to the brass tacks. Here are the absolute MUSTS of making bone broth:

You can use beef bones, chicken bones, turkey bones, lamb bones, buffalo bones, fish bones…but they MUST be 100% healthy. Which means no hormones, chemicals, GMO feed,  and they need to be free range, preferably grass-fed, etc. That might seem a tad overwhelming, but what kind of sense does it make to boil bones for 24 hours and then drink condensed chemicals and God knows what else? There’s a bit of sticker shock when it comes to organic meat/bones, but once you get used to that, it’s smooth sailing from there. Look for sales, find a local butcher who may even be willing to give you the bones at a discounted price, find a local (very good) farmer and work out a deal. There are options! And the more we support organic farmers and ranches, the less expensive it will be in the long run. More demand helps the farmers to better afford to do things organically and brings the price down, if you can believe it.

Bone broth will last in the fridge for 3 days and in the freezer for months. Use canning jars for freezing. Strain the broth into the jars.

Bone broth will last in the fridge for 3 days and in the freezer for months. Use canning jars for freezing. Strain the broth into the jars.

You MUST use just a bit of organic, unfiltered, apple cider vinegar. About 2 Tablespoons for a big pot. This helps leach all the good stuff out of the bones. You MUST also use joints, cartilage, even chicken feet or turkey feet add a ton of gelatin benefits. I used filtered water, you can also use spring water. I don’t know if this is a MUST, but it makes sense to me. If you fill your very expensive pot of bones and goodies with chlorine and fluoride and who knows what….what’s the point really? You can add whole organic veggies, veggie scraps, and organic herbs if you like. If you don’t want the smell of food in  your house, you can put your crock pot in a safe place in the garage or basement. But beware, if your garage or basement get really cold, you run the risk of cracking your pot. This very thing happened to my sister-in-law and she came out to the garage to find broth running down the front of whatever she had set the crock pot on. The thought of leaving it in our garage all night freaked me out a little, so I went ahead and left mine on the kitchen counter. I had already been cooking our Thanksgiving meal all day, so really, the smell of food for another several hours was not a big deal.

You can cool the broth and scrape off the fat layer, or not, it’s up to you. You can drink it hot in a cup like tea, use it in soup, or cook with it.

Leave some room in the top of the jar for expansion or the jar can crack. I've learned that the hard way!

Leave some room in the top of the jar for expansion or the jar can crack. I’ve learned that the hard way!

So there you have it. Bone Broth. Loaded with all kinds of good reasons you should make it and use it in your daily cooking. I plan to drink at least a cup of it each day. This week it’s turkey bone broth, next week I’m going to do a post on beef bone broth.

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There’s so many easy and tasty things we can do each day to take control of our own health. If you’re ill, have food allergies, migraines, hormone issues, skin issues, mood issues, weight issues, blood pressure issues, whatever the problem may be or even if you’re healthy as an OX…don’t wait around for something to change and someone else to tell you how to take control of your health. Do a little research, see what ailment alternatives are out there that may benefit you and your family. Partner up with your physician for a healthier you!

Resources:

Townsend Letter, The Examiner of Alternative Medicine

Oh Lardy, Everything You Need To Know About The Benefits of Bone Broth

Dr. Jockers, Supercharge Your Health, The Amazing Benefits of Bone Broth

Real Food RN, The Health Benefits of Bone Broth

Coconut Mama, Benefits of Bone Broth

Eat Naked, Healing Foods 101, Seven Reasons To Add Bone Broth To Your Daily Diet

Spicy Sausage and Bean Soup & Lazy Man’s Garlic Bread

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I could live on soup.

In fact, as long as I had a nice variety, I literally would eat soup every day of my life for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. I have no idea why I feel this way about soup, but really, what’s not to like about it? Your options are endless. You can make a light soup or a hardy soup. You can make a puree or you can make one with all kinds of yummy texture and flavor. All I ask is that you don’t eat it out of a can.

Soup is easy to make yourself (not as easy as opening a can…but not much harder)  and the payoff is huge. Just the fact that you’ve created something delicious from scratch all on your own is a plus. The fact that you can control what’s in it…that’s the important part. No chemicals, creepy thickeners, hidden allergens, or crazy genetically modified who knows what for you. Just simple organic ingredients that are beneficial for the whole family.

Spicy Sausage & Bean Soup 

3 Tablespoons Olive Oil

1 Small Onion, chopped

1/2 Cup Celery, sliced thinly

2 Garlic Cloves, chopped

About 2 Cups of your favorite GF/DF sausage, sliced (I used Hot Italian Pork & Sweet Italian Chicken)

4 Large Tuscan Kale Leaves (rib removed) rolled, cut in half, and sliced thinly

1 Tablespoon Fresh Thyme Leaves

1/2-1 teaspoon Red Pepper Flakes (depends on how spicy you like it)

1 15 oz. Can Great Northern Beans, rinsed and drained

1 15 oz. Can Black Beans, rinsed and drained

8 Cups Chicken Broth

1/2 teaspoon Old Bay Seasoning

Kosher Salt & Pepper to taste

Add the olive oil to a dutch oven or large pot and heat. Saute the onion, celery, garlic, sliced sausage, kale, thyme, and red pepper until the sausage is cooked through and the onion and celery are becoming translucent. Add the beans, broth, and Old Bay Seasoning and bring to a boil. Turn the heat down and simmer for 15 minutes. Add kosher salt and freshly ground pepper to taste.

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Lazy Man’s Garlic Bread

*Super easy and a perfect way to use up leftover hamburger buns.

2 Udi’s Gluten Free Hamburger Buns

Earth Balance Soy Free Butter Spread

Garlic Powder

Dried Oregano

Open the buns and spread with butter. Sprinkle generously with garlic powder and dried oregano. Place under the broiler until golden.

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Pumpkin Coffee Cake

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My husband likes to have sweet things for breakfast when he’s home. When he’s on the road he doesn’t have time to seek out allergen friendly diners for breakfast. Evidently daily breakfasts of hotel powdered eggs and unknown origin sausage during his work week arent very fulfilling. Probably in fact, gross. I think I would settle for an apple.

I’m a fan of simple these days. Coffee cake is an easy and filling breakfast (I also served it with a side of organic bacon), and can be made a gazillion different ways. This time I chose pumpkin because it’s that time of year. I also chose to make it really easy, but if you want a more complicated, Martha Stewart type of coffee cake that is also delicious, you can go here.

Pumpkin Coffee Cake

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Coat a 9 inch pie plate with nonstick spray and set aside.

Wet Ingredients:

1 Cup Pumpkin Puree

1 teaspoon Pure Vanilla Extract

1 Egg

1/2 Cup Almond Milk (or any DF milk)

1/4 Cup Coconut Oil, melted

Whisk all wet ingredients together with whisk until thoroughly combined and set aside.

Dry Ingredients

2 Cups Mama’s All Purpose Almond Flour (or your GF flour of choice)

1/2 Cup Granulated Sugar

1/2 teaspoon Kosher Salt

2 teaspoons Baking Powder

1 Tablespoon Pumpkin Pie Spice

Whisk all dry ingredients together and fold into the wet ingredients until combined. Pour into pie plate and set aside.

Topping:

1 Cup Gluten Free Rolled Oats

3/4 Cup Dark Brown Sugar

1/4 teaspoon Nutmeg

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

4 Tablespoons Mama’s All Purpose Almond Flour

5 Tablespoons Coconut Oil, melted

Measure all ingredients into a bowl and stir with fork until incorporated. Sprinkle over the cake. Bake for 45-50 minutes or until center tests done with a toothpick.

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Blueberry Yogurt Muffins

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After a very long week my husband finally arrived home last night at midnight. And that was after sitting in a meeting all day (all week) and a 7 1/2 hour drive home.

So I took pity on him and made him one of his favorites this morning. Blueberry muffins loaded with blueberries and a delicious side of local, organic, bacon.

Who wouldn’t want to wake up to the smell of warm blueberry muffins and bacon?

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Blueberry Yogurt Muffins

2 Cups of Mama’s All Purpose Almond Flour

2 teaspoons of Baking Powder

1 1/4 teaspoon of Xanthan Gum

1/4 (rounded) teaspoon of Kosher Salt

1/2 Cup of Dairy Free Butter

1 Cup of Granulated Sugar

1 Individual Sized Container of Dairy Free Vanilla Yogurt

1 Egg

1/2 teaspoon of Pure Vanilla Extract

1/2 Cup of Almond Milk

2 Cups of Frozen Blueberries (or a little more)

Raw Sugar For Sprinkling

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Line muffin tins, set aside. In a medium bowl combine the flour, baking powder, xanthum gum and salt. Whisk and set aside.

In a stand mixer cream the butter and sugar until light and fluffy, scrape down. Add sugar, yogurt, egg, vanilla, and milk. Beat for about 30 seconds or so until thoroughly combined. It will look curdled. Add the dry mixture to the wet and fold in with a spatula just until thoroughly combined. Fold in blueberries.

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Fill muffin liners and bake for 35-40 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

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Immune Boosting Breakfast

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Do you pay much attention to your immune system?

The immune system is a network of cells, tissues, and organs that work together to defend the body against attacks by “foreign” invaders.

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Many of us probably don’t give our inner workings much thought until we become ill.

I take a pro-biotic, vitamin D, multi vitamins, adrenal support, and fish oil every day. I typically get outside and get fresh air and exercise myself and the dogs at least 5 days a week. I eat organic fruits, vegetables, meats, and grains. I’m dairy free and gluten-free. And even though I post a lot of sugary items on my blog, I myself don’t eat much sugar on a regular basis.  But sometimes, even when we feel we are doing all the right things when it comes to our health, something invades our bodies and down goes the immune system.

workout-sick

The last time we chatted I think I told you I was suffering from dreaded Vertigo. Well, I went from having the flu, to vertigo, to having to be put on blood pressure medication, to a cold sore on my leg about the size of the palm of my hand, to a list of other symptoms, and now my doctor is trying to figure out just what in the heck is going on. Right now we’re traveling down the Lyme Disease road. I’ve tested positive on one of the tests and now the next step is to test again and see what happens. I’d say it’s kind of a double edged sword, all of this testing. On one hand, there’s NO WAY anyone would want Lyme Disease and on the other hand, you hope something in some test will come out positive so you can put a name to it, get treatment, and get back to feeling like yourself again.

This was my Immune Boosting  Breakfast this morning.

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Put a bit of organic olive oil in a small saute pan and heat. Add chopped spinach and stir until it wilts. Add one clove of chopped garlic, leftover wild caught salmon, and leftover organic brown rice. Gently toss around until everything is heated through and season with kosher salt, freshly ground pepper, Old Bay Seasoning, and dill.

Are you like me when you get sick?

I wage an ALL OUT war.

I research everything I can think of. Natural and mainstream medicine, ideas, and theories. I read blogs, I look for people who are talking about the same symptoms online, I look at all ways possible to get healthy again. Might sound a tad extreme, but educating yourself is never a bad thing. I like to feel good and healthy…doesn’t everyone? You’ve heard me say many times in past posts that you need to be pro-active with your health. Educating yourself and going to your doctor or Naturopath with ideas, concerns, and questions will only help you in the long run. Luckily, I have been able to find a practice that has an amazing nurse practitioner who so far is open to getting to the bottom of what is going on and exploring other options. I try to set aside my fears of appearing like a “difficult patient” when going in with ideas and questions. After all, what doctor has the time or resources to research every symptom, feeling, and question you have?  I remind myself that I pay big dollars for their time and help so I shouldn’t feel uncomfortable about taking an active role in getting better. Most doctors welcome pro-active patients. They can’t help you if you aren’t willing to help yourself. So, the war is on. We’ll get to the bottom of all of this eventually. Until then, I’m just taking it one day at a time.

If I feel good I do stuff, if I don’t, well then I don’t do too much stuff. Ha, sounds simple, but that’s my reality right now. I’ve been reading sweet little Christmas stories during my down time. I LOVE the Christmas season. When there are “things” going on in life, it’s fun and relaxing to read joyful, Christmas stories. These are fun and will really get you in the Christmas spirit.

A Nantucket Christmas by Nancy Thayer

Starry Night by Debbie Macomber

The Cat Who Came For Christmas by Cleveland Amory

A Virgin River Christmas by Robyn Carr

Angels At The Table by Debbie Macomber

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If you’d like a list of foods that help to strengthen the immune system you can go here:

Foods To Strengthen The Immune System

8 Foods To Build A Strong Immune System

20 Health Benefits of Brown Rice