Spicy Toasted Chickpeas

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I ran across this recipe in an article titled, “5 Ideas For Chickpeas”  in Good Housekeeping a couple of weeks ago. I switched it up a bit by using olive oil instead of vegetable oil, exchanging regular flour with almond flour, and I added garlic powder and sea salt as well. The fact that I am posting something about chickpeas (a.k.a. garbanzo beans) in one week, could quite possibly mean that I’m getting old. Now that I’m “older” a lot of the foods that I couldn’t bear to eat in my younger years, seem to be more appealing to me. Up until about a year ago, even the thought of eating garbanzo beans made me shudder. Then along came spicy, garlic, hummus into my life and the rest is history. Why was I so freaked out about the garbanzo bean? It tastes good! Whether it’s blended up for hummus, tossed in a salad, or even toasted like the recipe below. After they are toasted they are delicious! Kind of a soft center with a nice crispness on the outside. Spicy, salty, full of flavor.

There’s been some recent studies released touting the benefits of eating them too. Evidently, people who eat garbanzo beans on a regular basis consume fewer calories during the day and eat less junk food. Two cups of garbanzo beans equal your entire days fiber. Between 65-75% of the fiber found in these beans is insoluble which means it remains pretty much undigested all the way to your colon. And in case you’re wondering, that’s a good thing. In one study, people with high blood sugar consumed 1/3 cup of garbanzo beans daily for one week  and it improved the control of their blood sugar and insulin secretion. Another study showed that the garbanzo beans can be metabolized by a bacteria in our colon to produce fatty acids, these acids fuel the cells that line our intestinal walls. That means it helps to lower our risk of colon problems, including colon cancer. They also help to lower cholesterol, they are packed with 25% of our daily iron, and contain 85% of our daily requirement of Manganese which is a critical element in certain enzyme functions. So see? What’s so scary about the garbanzo bean?

Absolutely nothing, eat up and enjoy!

Spicy Toasted Chickpeas

Preheat oven to 425°

I didn’t measure anything that I put on these little critters. Use your own discretion, I like mine spicy! 

2 Cans Garbanzo Beans, rinsed, drained, and shaken “dry”

A Nice Drizzle of Olive Oil

Several Grinds of Sea Salt

A Very Good Sprinkle of Cayenne Pepper

A Nice Amount of Coriander (more than the cayenne)

A Good Sprinkle of Garlic Powder

About 1 Tbs. of Mama’s Almond Flour

Drain and rinse the beans and shake off as much water as possible. Place them on a clean dish towel.

Gather the corners and carefully toss the beans around a little with the other hand on the bottom of the bundle to remove any excess water.

Place the beans in a bowl and season with the ingredients above.

Stir, making sure all of the beans are thoroughly coated and pour them out onto a parchment covered baking sheet.

Bake for about 27 minutes, stirring once after about 15 minutes. Allow to cool completely, they will get even crisper as they cool.